1. "Red is the great clarifier—bright and revealing. I can’t imagine becoming bored with red—it would be like becoming bored with the person you love."  —Diana Vreeland

     
  2. "Idolatry is a man’s own thought, not the opinion of another." —John Selden


    Designs by Dolce & Gabbana / Fall 2013 RTW
    Images from style.com

     
  3. "What is the most beautiful in virile men is something feminine; what is most beautiful in feminine women is something masculine." —Susan Sontag

    Designs: Barbara Bui, Rick Owens, Bouchra Jarrar, Balenciaga, Dries Van Noten (Fall 2013 RTW)
    Images from style.com

     
  4. "We’re so trendy, we can’t even escape ourselves." —Curt Donald Cobain

    Designs: Dries Van Noten (Spring 2013 RTW), Antonio Marras (Fall 2013 RTW), Altuzarra (Fall 2011 RTW), No. 21 (Fall 2013 RTW)
    Images from style.com

     
  5. "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex… It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." —E. F. Schumacher


    Designs by Manish Arora / Fall RTW (2013)
    Images from style.com

     
  6. "I have found both freedom and safety in my madness; the freedom of loneliness and the safety from being understood, for those who understand us enslave something in us." —Kahlil Gibran, The Madman

    Designs by Manish Arora / Fall RTW (2013)
    Images from
    style.com

     

  7. Urban-de-Cour


    Manish Arora just got ass-smacked with a fresh, crisp towel when style.com posted a review of his Fall ready-to-wear collection. For having lack of focus. (Ugh. That’s so high-brow). The author, Maya Singer, writes:

    "Arora does himself no favors by throwing so many ideas on the runway; the profusion makes it exceedingly difficult to extract key propositions, or standout looks." 

    While her article may still have some reasonable points, Ms. Singer is still missing the point. And so may Arora be. Not because he has too many ideas, but because he has unleashed something truly amazing—maybe just not in the direction he aimed his arrow. His collection, nonetheless, represents it. An era of new urban: colorful, ethnic, rooted in both dirt and concrete. Not counterculture or “other” culture, but cultural, magnificent, distinct… and common. According to the National Geographic, out of the 7.1 billion people in the world, the most typical person is Chinese (and male). By 2030, that person will be from the subcontinent of India. We live in a vastly globalized and urban environment. Urban is also synonymous with diverse. In Queens, New York, reported to be “one of the largest urban centers in the United States,” there are approximately 138 languages spoken. An example just to make the point clear.

    Arora has only expressed one side of a faceted diamond, so here is one of many beginnings. Only time will tell whether this spark came from madness or genius.

    (I think the madness of genius prevails).

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    Written by Monifa Aldridge
    Image of Manish Arora from style.com

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  8. "Success is often achieved by those who don’t know that failure is inevitable."
    — Coco Chanel
     
  9. "God, this makes me want to piss tears."
    —#Apparel&Goods, upon viewing Prada’s Fall ready-to-wear collection (2013).

    (Source: wmagazine)

     

  10. Gender, Interrupted

    Masculinity is an affect. It is length and girth, hyper-extended. Exemplified by several Fall 2013 ready-to-wear collections that envelop form for edifice. Like what Art Deco is to the Empire State Building, rather, edifice to form. Rick Owens’ garments, for instance, cut wide at the shoulders—a display of dominance and force—and draws the eye abruptly downward along the arms. The body itself becomes a bell or a steeple, as identified by the sleeves, mitered corners, and folds, more than purposefully detailed.

    The triangle-as-symbol often denotes stability and foundational strength. It is replicated by the placement and opening of a zipper (Jarrar), wide lapels and the drape of a coat as it falls away from the body (Bui), a petaled enclosure (Balenciaga), or twist of a scarf (Van Noten). The adaptability of maleness to material and movement. It makes sense for women’s wear. The body is simply one dimension amongst many, for edifice and form to take place other than at the obvious sources, i.e. hips, tits, and ass. Hence, Jarrar’s curving scarves emboldened by contrast borders and checks. Bui and Van Noten even take care in contrast to allude to the female ultimately underneath it all, while Owens, at times, cinches in the ankles and whittles fabrics into knots and Balenciaga plays with other openings and drape. Each collection well staged and wonderfully crafted, these are example influences of gender blending for seasons yet to come.

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    Written by Monifa Aldridge
    Images from style.com

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    Dries Van Noten F2013 RTW